testprep Archives - Long Island Regents Prep

Online AP Review Courses with PrepIT

By Dennis Urban on Wednesday, October, 4th, 2017 in apush, review classes, test prep, testprep.
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Recently, Long Island Regents Prep teamed up with PrepIT, an online test prep platform and marketplace where students and teachers can purchase and sell review materials. We’re licensing our AP US History, AP Macroeconomics, APPsychology, AP Calculus AB, and AP Biology material to PrepIT, and they’re available for purchase at prepIT.io. Their Product PrepIT is […]


Recently, Long Island Regents Prep teamed up with PrepIT, an online test prep platform and marketplace where students and teachers can purchase and sell review materials. We’re licensing our AP US History, AP Macroeconomics, APPsychology, AP Calculus AB, and AP Biology material to PrepIT, and they’re available for purchase at prepIT.io.

Their Product

PrepIT is a web based test preparation platform that serves students, teachers, and course authors.  Gathering meaningful data on student performance is a time consuming task for any teacher.  With the PrepIT platform teachers can create review courses for any subject and share it with their students.  As students interact with the course, data is aggregated and shared back to the classroom teacher and students, providing guidance on areas to focus more attention.  In addition to these features, teachers and students are able to buy pre-made courses for a variety of subjects.  These courses have been written by approved authors.  Last year we tested our data tools with 4,000 AP Government students and 150 teachers.

Their Team

Mike Clancy

Mike Clancy is an AP Government and AP US History teacher in Muscatine, Iowa.  He has been teaching for nine years and has experience at the elementary, middle, and high school levels.  His idea for PrepIT was inspired by his students love of class trivia games and the teachers need to prioritize review time on student weaknesses. Before teaching in Iowa Mike taught internationally in Vietnam, and also served as a Teach for America corps member in Kansas City, Missouri. Mike received his bachelor’s degree from the University of Northern Iowa and a Masters in Education from Rockhurst University in Missouri.  Mike also completed a graduate certificate program in educational technology from SUNY, Buffalo.

TJ

TJ McDonaldhas been working in education since 1999 after earning an undergraduate degree from the University of Iowa. He

moved to North Carolina in 2001 and worked in the training group for high tech companies such as IBM and Lenovo.  Eventually he became a certified program manager, PMP, at Global Knowledge which is the world’s largest learning solutions provider. During this time his client list included Fortune 500 companies such as Microsoft, Cisco, Citibank, and the New York Stock Exchange. While in North Carolina he also earned an MBA from NC State with a concentration in entrepreneurship and technology.

We Write Code

We Write Code builds outstanding digital products, but we’re more than just a good software development company. We’re passionate about helping our clients bring their ideas to life.

Our team has spent years shepherding clients and their ideas from “napkin sketch” concepts to scalable, leading-edge products. We believe the best technical solutions start with collaboration and trust. We believe in the power of well-written code, but technical excellence alone is not enough. We believe good development is interactive, flexible, and highly-personalized, with clearly defined checkpoints and frequent iterations to provide feedback and value along the way.

Based in Des Moines, Iowa, we partner with companies worldwide, both large and small. No matter the size or scope of your project—from startup product planning and early demos to ongoing development and product support—our goal is to help you define the technical challenges and build a product that best suits your business needs, both now and in the future.

We love building innovative products for our clients, and we have a lot of fun doing it. When we’re not crafting creative code, you can find us brainstorming at the nearest taco stand.

 

 

Toward a Reading Life: 4 Pivotal Questions for Students

By Dennis Urban on Sunday, March, 13th, 2016 in reading, test prep, testprep.
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When we ask ourselves what students can do to prepare for standardized testing, there is one simple answer: “Read, read, read.” Here follow four pivotal questions students should think about, attempt to answer, and make changes in their reading life to be better prepared academically. Why do I need to read to do better on […]


reading for test prep

Reading for Pleaure…and for Test Prep

When we ask ourselves what students can do to prepare for standardized testing, there is one simple answer: “Read, read, read.” Here follow four pivotal questions students should think about, attempt to answer, and make changes in their reading life to be better prepared academically.

  1. Why do I need to read to do better on standardized tests?

The single most important thing you can do to prepare yourself for all standardized tests is to spend a reasonable amount of time, every day reading!  Why?  Reading definitely increases your vocabulary; it builds and improves all your language skills; it adds a great deal to your ability to analyze any problem in any content area.  It has the ability to provide you with important background knowledge for any subject. Reading also builds your own confidence by empowering you to talk about people, places, and events.  In addition, it’s great to read language as it is used by authors.  Furthermore, reading the writings of others is an excellent way to help you improve your own writing!  Developing a reading routine—meaning spending a reasonable amount of time reading everyday is truly the daily vitamin that will make you a stronger test-taker in every subject.

  1. What should I read?

Novels can definitely be great reads.  They can stimulate your imagination.  They can give you insight into the human condition.  They can help you understand conflicts and resolutions.  And there are so many types of fiction that you can read—historical fiction, science-fiction, detective and mystery fiction, horror fiction, romance, etc.  And those genres are not restricted to novels.  There’s an entire universe of short stories out there on every possible theme!

But when considering becoming a better student and preparing for standardized testing the best answer to the question, “Should I just read novels?” is, “Absolutely not!”  Biographies, autobiographies, and non-fiction are under-appreciated for their excellent value to us.  For one thing, they are among the richest source of factual information. Biographies expand our content knowledge when we read the lives of figures in any field of life’s endeavors—figures in history, explorers, scientists in every scientific field, mathematicians, musicians, artists, athletes and so on.  There is no better way to understand these fields than through those whose lives have been dedicated to them.  And in biographies and non-fictions, we may come to understand how others have overcome obstacles, dealt with tragedy, faced handicaps, fought for human rights, etc.  These works are loaded with extremely valuable life lessons.  Through these works, you can also increase your own self-discovery; you will likely see the world in new ways; you will come to new understanding of current affairs, history, politics, and physical and mental health.  Biographies, autobiographies, and non-fiction have the capacity to make you a better, more knowledgeable, and more aware individual.   They are a treasure trove of knowledge which can only help you be a better student and be better prepared for standardized testing.

  1. How can I make myself more likely to read regularly?

Whether you’re reading books electronically or in print, there is something to be said for owning your own personal library at home.  It doesn’t have to be large.  It just has to be yours.  That’s what makes it rich!  It will help you remember the great books you’ve read—and their authors.  It will motivate you to pick up a book and read.  It will serve as a resource for your writing and other assignments.  Although there are no rules for a personal library, here are some suggestions of what it could consist of:

  • Books you’ve read, loved, and want to hold onto, or hand off to a brother or sister.  (Think of it as your own personal collection!)
  • Books you want to get around to reading one of these days.

(If the books readily accessible, it greatly increases the likelihood of your reading them.)

  • Books on a favorite topic of yours.

(They don’t have to be masterpieces.  They may be books on music, sports, animals—whatever you’re interested in.)

  • Books you can refer to.

(A few textbooks and reference works can be very helpful in doing assignments and projects.)   

Once you have your own personal library, you’ll be amazed how easy it’ll be to grow it.

  1. How do I know if I’m reading enough?  Should I read a certain amount every month?

There probably isn’t one answer to this question; if you can list your five favorite books as well as name your favorite author or authors, you very likely have an excellent reading background.  If not, it’s a sign that you need to read more books and discover authors who speak to you!  This can become an academic and intellectual goal.  It won’t take long, and it will make you a more intelligent individual who is better prepared academically. 

There may even be a more practical reason for knowing your favorite books and authors.  For a college interview, will you be able to answer such questions as, “Who is your favorite author?” “What are you reading these days?” “What’s the most interesting book you’ve ever read?”  The interviewer will learn a great deal about you from that answer!

Free Regents Prep Resources

By Dennis Urban on Monday, May, 19th, 2014 in farmingdale, regents, Regents Review, regentsprep.org, science, social studies, testprep, trigonometry, us history.
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The folks at Long Island Regents Prep know you have a lot of options when choosing Regents Review Courses, with test prep companies offering review classes at Adelphi, Molloy, and Hofstra. But we’re different. Our company is owned and operated by current, NYS-certified Long Island high school educators, who teach at top-performing schools throughout Nassau […]


Regents review classes in Farmingdale, Long Island

The folks at Long Island Regents Prep know you have a lot of options when choosing Regents Review Courses, with test prep companies offering review classes at Adelphi, Molloy, and Hofstra. But we’re different. Our company is owned and operated by current, NYS-certified Long Island high school educators, who teach at top-performing schools throughout Nassau and Suffolk counties. Plus, our classes are affordable–a fraction of what a tutor would cost–and are conveniently located on the Nassau-Suffolk border, at Farmingdale State College. See our Regents Review Schedule at liregentsprep.com, and contact us if you have any questions.

In the meantime, check out these FREE online resources to help you study for the Regents Exams. Good luck!

 

United States History and Government Regents Review

U.S. History Regents Review Flash Cards

Mr. Klaff’s United States History and Government Review Sheet

Dr. Urban’s U.S. History Notes

 

Global History and Geography Regents Review

Global History Regents Review

Mr. Klaff’s Global Studies Review Sheet

Global Regents Review Links

Brief Review in Global History and Geography

 

Integrated Algebra Regents Review

Integrated Algebra Regents Study Guide

 

Algebra 2/Trigonometry Regents Review

New York Regents Test Prep Workbook for Algebra 2 and Trigonometry

Mr. Ellis’s Algebra 2/Trigonometry Review

 

Geometry Regents Review

Geometry Review Booklet – NYC Department of Education

Mr. Kennedy Math – Geometry Regents Review

Regents Geometry Review Notes – Columbia Secondary School

 

Chemistry Regents Review

New York State Chemistry Review

Chemistry Review Sheets and Study Guides – Rosen Review

Mr. Kent’s Chemistry Page

 

Living Environment Regents Review

Biology/Living Environment Regents Review Links

New York State Living Environment Review

Review Sheets with the Key Ideas and Performance Indicators

 

Earth Science Regents Review

Earth Science Regents Review Materials

Ken Gould’s RegentsEarth Site

Regents Earth Science Review

 

Physics Regents Review

St. Mary’s Physics Online

A-Plus Physics Regents Review

Regents Review Resources

Suffolk Spring College Fair

By Dennis Urban on Saturday, April, 20th, 2013 in advanced placement review, college, college fair, regents review classes, testprep.
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Long Island Regents Prep is excited to be participating in the Suffolk Spring College Fair, sponsored by WesteSuffolk Counselors’ Association. The College Fair will take place on Monday, April 22, from 6:00 PM to 8:30 PM. Students will be able to visit representatives from dozens of colleges and register for AP and Regents review courses offered by Long Island Regents Prep. […]


Long Island Regents Prep is excited to be participating in the Suffolk Spring College Fair, sponsored by WesteSuffolk Counselors’ Association. The College Fair will take place on Monday, April 22, from 6:00 PM to 8:30 PM. Students will be able to visit representatives from dozens of colleges and register for AP and Regents review courses offered by Long Island Regents Prep. In addition, we’ll be raffling off a free Advanced Placement or Regents review course and offering discounted on-site registration!  Please stop by our booth to find out more about our courses! Here are the details:
Suffolk Spring College Fair
Monday, April 22, 2013
6:00 PM – 8:30 PM
Huntington Hilton Hotel, Melville NY
Directions: Take Long Island Expressway East to Exit 49S (Rte 110 South / Broadhollow Rd.) Turn Right at end of ramp onto Rt. 110 S / Broadhollow Road. Proceed 2 miles to the corner of Spagnoli Rd and Broadhollow Rd and the hotel is on the right.
 

Online Resources for AP Review

By Dennis Urban on Monday, April, 1st, 2013 in advanced placement, advanced placement review, ap classes, ap review classes, testprep.
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Since the Advanced Placement exams are only about a month away, we are providing some free online resources to help students prepare for their exams.  Below are links to general and subject-specific AP review materials.  In addition, for more info about our AP review courses or to register online, visit the Long Island Regents Prep website. […]


AP Review Classes in Farmingdale, Long Island Since the Advanced Placement exams are only about a month away, we are providing some free online resources to help students prepare for their exams.  Below are links to general and subject-specific AP review materials.  In addition, for more info about our AP review courses or to register online, visit the Long Island Regents Prep website.  Good luck!
General AP Review Resources
College Board AP Practice Questions – Since the College Board designs these exams, you may want to check out this site first.  It offers exam overviews and practice questions from previous exams.
AP Study Notes – This site features course outlines, notes, vocabulary, and practice tests for several AP courses, with more being released in the coming weeks.
McGraw-Hill’s Practice Plus AP Quizzes – McGraw-Hill offers diagnostic quizzes for over a dozen AP exams.
AP Practice Exams – As the site name indicates, they provide practice tests for many AP courses.

Enrollment in Advanced Placement Courses Continues to Rise

By Dennis Urban on Monday, March, 18th, 2013 in advanced placement, advanced placement review, ap classes, ap exams, ap review classes, testprep.
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Springtime is nearly upon us, and many high school seniors are eagerly awaiting news from colleges regarding admissions and financial aid.  High school students aiming for admission into elite colleges often enroll in Advanced Placement courses with the hope of burnishing their transcripts and applications, preparing for rigorous college-level coursework, and earning college credit for […]


Springtime is nearly upon us, and many high school seniors are eagerly awaiting news from colleges regarding admissions and financial aid.  High school students aiming for admission into elite colleges often enroll in Advanced Placement courses with the hope of burnishing their transcripts and applications, preparing for rigorous college-level coursework, and earning college credit for passing scores on the A.P. exams.  Recently, however, colleges and universities have begun reconsidering whether to give credits for Advanced Placement courses.  For example, earlier this year, Dartmouth College announced that it would no longer give college credit for high scores on Advanced Placement exams.  According to the New York Times, this change—a response to the concern that high school A.P. classes “are not as rigorous as college courses”—will begin with the class of 2018, affecting those who graduate high school next year.
Not unexpectedly, the College Board has decried this decision, maintaining that Advanced Placement courses expose students to, and thus prepare them for, college-level work.  According to the College Board’s recent AP Report to the Nation, “more high school graduates are participating—and succeeding—in college-level AP courses and exams than ever before.” College Board president David Coleman said, “By exposing students to college-level work while still in high school, Advanced Placement dramatically improves college completion rates,” and he applauded educators who have worked to bring Advanced Placement courses to more students in more schools around the country.  Findings from the report indicated,
·      The number of high school graduates taking AP Exams increased to 954,070, (32.4%), up from 904,794 (30.2%) among the class of 2011 and 471,404 (18.0%) in 2002 among the class of 2002.
·      The number of high school graduates scoring a 3 or higher increased to 573,472 (19.5%), up from 541,000 (18.1%) among the class of 2011 and 305,098 (11.6%) among the class of 2002.
Whether these numbers represent better preparation for college and the workplace is, of course, up for debate, but they do signal a clear rise in the importance of Advanced Placement courses at the high-school level, even if colleges doubt the academic rigor of such courses.
In New York State, the statistics mirror the national trends, as more students continue to enroll and succeed in Advanced Placement Exams.  That is why Long Island Regents Prep is now offering one-day Advanced Placement Review Courses at Farmingdale State College on May 5, 2013.  Visit liregentsprep.wpengine.comfor more information and to register for courses.

Helping High School Students Pass the Test

By Dennis Urban on Monday, January, 7th, 2013 in advanced placement review, ap exams, ap review classes, NYS Regents Exams, regents, regents review classes, regentsprep.org, State University of New York, testprep.
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Long Island Regents Prep Announces 2013 Regents and AP Review Class Schedule   Long Island Regents Prep has announced its 2013 course schedule.  Review classes for the New York State Regents Exams will take place June 8th, 9th, and 15that Farmingdale State College.  In addition, after helping hundreds of students from Nassau and Suffolk counties and […]


Long Island Regents Prep Announces 2013 Regents and AP Review Class Schedule

 
Long Island Regents Prep has announced its 2013 course schedule.  Review classes for the New York State Regents Exams will take place June 8th, 9th, and 15that Farmingdale State College.  In addition, after helping hundreds of students from Nassau and Suffolk counties and New York City excel on the Regents exams over the past several years, Long Island Regents Prep has decided to begin offering Advanced Placement review classes, which are scheduled for May 5th.

May 5, 2013 – AP Review Classes

  • United States History
  • World History
  • European History
  • US Government and Politics
  • Psychology
  • Calculus AB
  • Biology
  • Physics B
  • Chemistry
  • Environmental Science
June 8, 2013 – Regents Review Classes

  • Living Environment
  • Earth Science
  • Chemistry
  • Physics
  • Global History and Geography
  • United States History and Government
  • Integrated Algebra
  • Algebra 2/Trigonometry
  • Geometry

June 9, 2013 – Regents Review Classes

  • Living Environment
  • Earth Science
  • Chemistry
  • Physics
  • Global History and Geography
  • United States History and Government
  • Integrated Algebra
  • Algebra 2/Trigonometry
  • Geometry

June 15, 2013 – Regents Review Classes


  • Chemistry
  • Geometry


All classes are taught by experienced, highly qualified, New York State certified teachers in comfortable, state-of-the-art classrooms on the campus of Farmingdale State College, a State University of New York (SUNY) institution of higher learning.

 
Long Island Regents Prep is owned and operated by three current high school teachers who understand the importance of the Regents and AP examinations and the pressure that high-stakes tests place on students.  With this in mind, they have created clear, concise, six-hour review courses that provide students with the content, skills, and confidence they need to excel on their Regents and Advanced Placement exams.  Students can register online quickly, easily, and safely by visiting http://liregentsprep.wpengine.com
 
What:
Review courses for Regents and Advanced Placement exams
 
Where:
Farmingdale State College (Gleeson Hall)
2350 Broad Hollow Road  
Farmingdale, NY 11735
 
When:
AP Review Classes – May 5, 2013 (9:00AM – 4:00PM)
Regents Review Classes – June 8, 9, 15, 2013 (9:00AM – 4:00PM)
 
Registration:
Visit http://liregentsprep.wpengine.com for more information and to register for classes. 
 
Contact Us:
Long Island Regents Prep
P.O. Box 1021
Bellmore, NY  11710
Call: (516) 847-1265
Twitter: @RegentsPrep
 
 
 

 

 

Tips for dealing with test anxiety

By sbofill on Monday, March, 12th, 2012 in ACT, regents, SAT, test anxiety, testprep.
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For many students, the end of the school year brings a combination of excitement and anxiety. As the days grow warmer, students look forward to their two-month summer break.  But, before fleeing to the beaches or to summer camp, they must first pass their finals, Regents exams, and, perhaps, take the SATs and ACTs. School can be stressful […]


For many students, the end of the school year brings a combination of excitement and anxiety. As the days grow warmer, students look forward to their two-month summer break.  But, before fleeing to the beaches or to summer camp, they must first pass their finals, Regents exams, and, perhaps, take the SATs and ACTs. School can be stressful enough without the added pressure of standardized exams, but test anxiety is becoming increasingly widespread in our test-obsessed age of accountability.
 
According to the Penn State University Learning Center, symptoms of test anxiety can include insomnia, loss of appetite, panic, confusion, hopelessness, anger, and depression.
 
There are ways of dealing with these symptoms. Georgetown University’s Counseling and Psychiatric Service website lists helpful tips for reducing test anxiety. Before the exam, students should get a good night’s sleep, eat a modest meal, avoid other students who are stressed, and arrive early for the test.  During the exam, students might consider budgeting their time wisely, answering the easiest questions first, and making a brief outline of ideas.
 
In addition, Georgetown psychologist Wayne Hurr recommends relaxation techniques.  He writes, “If your mind is blocked by tension during an exam, close your eyes, take a long, deep breath, and then let it out slowly. Concentrate on your breathing and actually feel or hear yourself breathe. Don’t allow yourself to worry about the time, test, or tension.  Repeat this twice, then return to the test.”
 
Finally, researchers at the universities of Colorado and Chicago have found that writing down feelings shortly before an exam can reduce test anxiety and improve exam scores.  Perhaps students should jot down some of their summer vacation plans to help offset the stress!
 
This article was originally published on http://farmingdale.patch.com.

As the end of the school year approaches, you might want to start studying for your final exams and taking some practice Regents tests.  Fortunately, you don’t have to go out and buy review books to prepare.  There are plenty of practice questions online, in all subjects, and they’re free!

To access every New York State Regents Exam that’s ever been given (they go back to the 1930s), check out the NYS Education Department website.  There you can find exams, answers, and scoring rubrics, so you’ll know exactly how the tests are graded in June.

If you’re interested in studying course content and practicing Regents questions, then check out http://regentsprep.org, which is run by the Oswego City School District.  This is a wonderful, nonprofit service that offers help in every subject.

We hope that you find these sites helpful.  Good luck as you prepare for the end of the school year!

Well, it’s been a while since our last post, but we’ve all been waiting anxiously for the final version of the June 2011 Regents Exam Schedule, which you can access here.

The release of the exam schedule has allowed us to finalize our 2011 Regents Review classes.  The courses, which are listed below, will be offered at Farmingdale State College on June 12th and June 18th.

June 12
Global History and Geography
United States History and Government
Comprehensive English
Geometry
Integrated Algebra
Algebra 2/Trigonometry
Physics
Earth Science
Chemistry
Living Environment

June 18
Spanish
Geometry
Algebra 2/Trigonometry
Chemistry
Living Environment